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Can High Blood Sugar Cause Rapid Heartbeat

Potential Role Of Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy

What a High Blood Sugar Feels Like

It is possible that an interaction between hypoglycemia-induced abnormalities of cardiac repolarization and autonomic neuropathy contributes to the risk of sudden death in individuals with diabetes. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy is known to be associated with an increased mortality, and resting QT intervals are generally longer in patients with autonomic neuropathy than in patients without . The recent demonstration that brief periods of experimental hypoglycemia impair CV autonomic function for up to 16 h is additional evidence for a clinically relevant interaction .

However, not all data are supportive, since individuals with diabetic autonomic neuropathy actually have smaller increments in QT intervals during experimental hypoglycemia than individuals without . The apparent paradox relates to the diminished sympathoadrenal responses that are observed both in patients with neuropathy and after repeated episodes of hypoglycemia. Thus, on the one hand, a combination of autonomic neuropathy and then a severe episode leading to a powerful sympathoadrenal response might substantially increase the risk of arrhythmia-provoked sudden death, whereas on the other hand, repeated hypoglycemia in a person with impaired sympathoadrenal responses and longstanding diabetes might be protective. The way in which these different factors interact to confer risk is poorly understood and requires further experimental work.

Diabetes Linked To Irregular Heartbeat

Diabetes is linked to a 40 percent greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation the most common kind of chronically irregular heartbeat, researchers found in a new study.

The researchers also found that this risk for irregular heartbeat rises even higher the longer people have diabetes and the less controlled their blood sugar is.

For three years, the researchers tracked more than 1,400 Group Health patients who had newly recognized atrial fibrillation. They compared these cases with more than 2,200 controls. The controls were matched to the cases by age, sex, year, and whether they were treated for high blood pressure but unlike the cases, they had no atrial fibrillation.

Dublins study was the first to examine the relationship between atrial fibrillation and the duration of patients diabetes and their blood sugar levels. Unlike most prior studies, this one also adjusted for patients weight, which is important because both diabetes and atrial fibrillation are more common in heavier people.

The researchers found that patients with diabetes were 40 percent more likely to be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation than were people without diabetes.

Journal of General Internal Medicine, April 2010

Main Symptoms Of High Blood Glucose

While an individual can have no noticeable symptoms and still have high blood glucose, knowing what kinds of symptoms tend to accompany high blood glucose helps us take the right action before things get worse. If for no other reason, keeping these markers of high blood glucose in mind can help you identify it more quickly in yourself.

The most common symptoms to be aware of are:

  • Thirst
  • Increased cravings for carbs and sweets
  • âHangerâ
  • Poor energy levels or midday crashes
  • Fatigue
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    Managing Blood Sugar Levels

    Many people with diabetes must check their blood sugar levels daily with a glucose meter. This device takes a drop of blood, usually from a finger, and displays the sugar level within a few seconds.

    People with type 1 diabetes will need to take insulin as their doctor recommends, usually several times a day.

    Those with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes may need to change their diet and exercise habits. They may also need to take oral medications or insulin.

    A number of strategies can help prevent hyperglycemia.

    People should:

    • check their blood sugar levels as their doctor advises and take the correct amount of insulin, if they have type 1 diabetes
    • speak to their healthcare provider or dietitian about which foods to eat or avoid, how much to eat, and how often
    • take precautions to avoid infections, for example, through regular hand washing, as illness, such as a cold, can trigger a rise in blood pressure
    • plan their food intake and exercise to balance blood sugar levels
    • minimize stress, as far as possible, for example, through exercise, getting enough sleep, and stress-reducing activities such as meditation or yoga

    Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can happen when a person:

    • has certain medical conditions
    • does a lot of exercise
    • skips meals or eats too little

    It can also be a side effect of diabetes medicines. Taking too much insulin can result in low blood sugar levels.

    Symptoms of low blood sugar may include:

    • visit a doctor regularly

    Keeping Your Heart Healthy

    How to Balance Blood Sugar Levels

    You can benefit from the heightened mental and physical energy that food provides without stressing your metabolic system or posing risks to your cardiovascular system. Minimize consumption of simple sugars and starches, and instead consume complex carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables and whole-grain foods. These foods take longer to release sugars into your blood and provide your brain and body with a steady source of glucose.

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    When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

    Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it’s also formed and stored inside the body. It’s the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and is carried to each cell through the bloodstream. Our brains depend on glucose to function, even when we’re sleeping.

    The is the amount of glucose in the blood. When these levels drop too low, it’s called hypoglycemia . Very low blood sugar levels can cause serious symptoms that need to be treated right away.

    Risk Factors For High Blood Sugar

    Doctors do not know exactly what causes diabetes. Some factors may increase the risk, however.

    Type 1 diabetes

    Researchers believe certain genetic or environmental factors may make people more likely to get type 1 diabetes.

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases say certain genes play a role, and other factors such as viruses and infections may have an impact.

    The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation say that there is nothing a person can do to prevent type 1 diabetes. Eating, exercise, or other lifestyle choices will not change the outcome.

    Type 1 diabetes usually begins during childhood or early adulthood, but it can happen at any age.

    Type 2 diabetes

    The following risk factors may make developing type 2 diabetes more likely:

    • having certain genes

    People who have high blood sugar should discuss their target levels with their doctor.

    They may need regular testing to keep these within a healthy range. Each person is different and levels can vary between individuals.

    To find out their blood sugar levels, the person may need to fast for 8 hours, 2 hours after a meal, or at both times.

    Some people may also take a glucose tolerance test, in which they drink a sugary liquid and have a blood test after.

    The American Diabetes Association recommend a pre-meal blood sugar level of 80130 milligrams per deciliter . Around 1 to 2 hours after the beginning of a meal, blood sugar should be less than 180 ml/dL.

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    Can Low Blood Sugar Cause High Blood Pressure

    Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, is defined as blood sugar levels of 70 milligrams per deciliter or lower. Symptoms of low blood sugar can include tiredness, sweating, and tingling lips. High blood pressure, also called hypertension, can also be a sign of low blood sugar.

    Low blood sugar is especially common in people with type 1 diabetes, in which the pancreas creates little or no insulin. However, it can also occur in people with type 2 diabetes who take insulin or certain medications.

    Capturing Heart Palpitations In Action

    Low Blood Sugar vs High Blood Sugar

    If you are at risk for a heart rhythm problem, or if palpitations are interfering with your life or mental health, a recording of your heart’s rhythm for 24 hours or even longer may capture an electrical “signature” of the problem. Getting visual evidence of this signature can help determine how best to treat your palpitations.

    A Holter monitor constantly records your heart’s rhythm for 24 hours as you go about your daily activities. Small patches called electrodes are stuck onto your chest and attached to a recorder that you carry in a pocket or wear around your neck or waist. During the test, you keep a diary of what you are doing and how you feel, along with the time of day of each entry. When you return the monitor to your doctor, he or she will look at the recording to see if there have been any irregular heart rhythms.

    Twenty-four hours often isn’t long enough to detect palpitations. An event recorder can monitor the heart for days or weeks. There’s even an implantable recorder that can invisibly monitor the heart for a year or more.

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    What To Do If Foods Cause You Heart Palpitations

    First off, take note if you feel any additional symptoms, because those could signal that youre experiencing more than simple palpitations. Seek emergency medical help if at any point you also have:

    • Shortness of breath
    • Pain or discomfort in the upper back, arms, neck, or jaw
    • Feeling of impending doom

    If its the first time youve ever noticed heart palpitations, make a follow-up appointment with your doctor. Its likely nothing is wrong, but its always best to err on the side of caution and make sure that the food-related episode isnt the first sign of a bigger issue.

    Next, start a log and record times when the palpitations recur. Note what you ate or drank and what sort of emotional state you were in. If specific foods or beverages tend to cause recurrences, take that as a sign you should reduce or eliminate those foods from your diet. Your body and your heart couldnt be telling you any more clearly that those substances are doing you harm.

    When I Eat Carbs And Sugar My Heart Rate Increases Why Is That

    Ive been on a very low carb diet for the past four months. When I eat carbs and sugar, my heart rate increases and I can feel it even when Im not doing anything. Why is that? Can I stop it?

    A person is diagnosed with tachycardia when the heart rate is more than 100 beats per minute . The normal resting heart rate for adults is about 60 to 100 BPM and for infants, it is about 110 BPM.

    Tachycardia after eating is an uncommon disorder and for the people who experience it, it can create anxiety and stress. Experiencing slightly higher heart rate after having snacks or meals is quite normal, because increased flow of blood is required to digest the food. But, if your heart starts beating rigorously after meals, then it could be a symptom of tachycardia. There is no need to panic as people who experience it can lead a normal life.

    The episodes of rapid heartbeat usually begin within 30 to 60 minutes after a meal. The heart rate may go up to 120 beats per minute or even more. Sometimes, it lasts up to 6 hours. An adrenaline rush may be experienced by the person. There can be difficulty in resting, sleeping, or breathing. The person may suffer from bloating and indigestion. If your heart starts beating irregularly or very rapidly after eating, you could have cardiac arrhythmia.

    Causes of High Heart Rate after Meals

    > > Processed food or food high in oil or food rich in MSG, nitrates and sodium can make your heart beat faster.

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    Racing Heartbeat: Should You See A Doctor

    My heart was beating really fast, but I dont have symptoms now. Should I see a doctor?

    If youve asked yourself this question, then youve probably noticed your heart skipping a beat, fluttering, or just feeling like its working too hard inside your chest, neck, or throat.

    Everyone has a racing heart from time to time. Stress, exercise, or even too much alcohol or caffeine can cause your heart to beat faster than normal.

    But if your heart races a lotor if you notice your heartbeat is often irregularthen you should see a doctor.

    Even though most racing heartbeats are caused by common situations , some irregular heartbeats are caused by serious heart conditions like atrial fibrillation. People who have these conditions need monitoring and treatment from a cardiologist .

    Caffeinated Foods / Beverages

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    The research around caffeine is a little less definitive since a study released at the start of 2016 found no relationship between caffeine consumption and palpitations. However, those results dont change the fact that caffeine revs up your sympathetic nervous system and spikes your levels of stress hormones , raising your blood pressure and increasing your heart rate. Caffeine also acts as a diuretic, which can wash away your potassium and magnesium stores, creating an electrolyte imbalance that disrupts the heart rhythm.

    In my experience, placing extra stress on the heartas caffeine doescan aggravate existing arrhythmias or cause new ones. One of the reasons beta blockers are prescribed to heart attack patients is that they help control heart rate and prevent sudden changes in heart rate and rhythm by blunting the effect of the stress hormone adrenaline.

    For those of you with healthy hearts, your daily dose of coffee, tea, or chocolate probably wont cause any harm. Beware, though, of caffeine-containing energy drinks, which are particularly popular with young people. These drinks, which combine caffeine with large amounts of sugar, have been linked with heart palpitations, arrhythmia, heart attack, and sudden cardiac death in adolescents and young adults.

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    Causes Related To Lifestyle

    Physical inactivity

    Exercising prompts your body to burn more energy than usual, and, as a result, consume more glucose. Maintaining a low level of physical activity, on the other hand, means more glucose will remain in the bloodstream. This raises your overall blood glucose values in the process.

    Exercise also makes our body more insulin sensitive, which means we will require less insulin for the rest of the day to control glucose levels.

    Stress

    Part of the bodyâs fight-or-flight response to stress is to produce additional glucose. Another facet of that response is an increase in the hormone cortisol. High cortisol can reduce the bodyâs sensitivity to insulin. As a result, blood glucose levels may also increase.

    Poor sleep

    A lack of quality sleep can inhibit how much insulin your body can release. It can also cause the production of cortisol, which makes it harder for insulin to work. When your bodyâs insulin cannot properly metabolize the glucose in your blood, the glucose remains there and your glucose levels rise.

    Get better insight into your glucose levels

    Want to gain a better understanding of how your body responds to glucose? Try monitoring your glucose levels in real time with the Nutrisense Continuous Glucose Health Program.

    Maintain An Active Lifestyle

    Take breaks during a sedentary workday, add a walk around the block to your morning routine, or try a new form of exercise. These activities bring great benefit in both the short and long term while helping reduce your overall stress. Including regular strength training and aerobic exercise will help to lower glucose values, as well.

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    Atrial Or Supraventricular Tachycardia

    Atrial or supraventricular tachycardia is a fast heart rate that starts in the upper chambers of the heart. Some forms of this particular tachycardia are paroxysmal atrial tachycardia or paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia .

    With atrial or supraventricular tachycardia, electrical signals in the hearts upper chambers fire abnormally. This interferes with electrical impulses coming from the sinoatrial node, the hearts natural pacemaker.

    The disruption results in a faster than normal heart rate. This rapid heartbeat keeps the hearts chambers from filling completely between contractions, which compromises blood flow to the rest of the body.

    A profile for atrial or SVT

    In general, those most likely to have atrial or supraventricular tachycardia are:

    • Children
    • Women, to a greater degree than men
    • Anxious young people

    In extreme cases, those suffering with atrial or SVT may also experience:

    • Unconsciousness

    Treatment for Atrial or SVT

    If you have atrial or SVT, its possible that you wont need treatment.

    But if the episodes are prolonged, or recur often, your doctor may recommend treatment, including:

    • Some medicinal and street drugs

    Other, less common causes may include:

    Approach to treatment

    Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

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    How you react to low blood sugar may not be the same as how someone else with low blood sugar reacts. Its important to know your signs. Common symptoms may include:

    • Fast heartbeat
    • Hunger

    If youve had low blood sugar without feeling or noticing symptoms , you may need to check your blood sugar more often to see if its low and treat it. Driving with low blood sugar can be dangerous, so be sure to check your blood sugar before you get behind the wheel.

    You may not have any symptoms when your blood sugar is low . If you dont have symptoms, it will be harder to treat your low blood sugar early. This increases your risk of having severe lows and can be dangerous. This is more likely to happen if you:

    • Have had diabetes for more than 5-10 years.
    • Frequently have low blood sugar.
    • Take certain medicines, such as beta blockers for high blood pressure.

    If you meet one or more of the above and you have hypoglycemia unawareness, you may need to check your blood sugar more often to see if its low. This is very important to do before driving or being physically active.

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